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Poll:RRSP 101 (All RSP questions answered)
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I find this info useful, thanks. 83% (20)
this is basic info, i know this already! 17% (4)

RRSP 101 (All RSP questions answered)




desipyare
Junior Desi
Member since: Nov 06




Posts: 1
Location:


Hello,

This is an excellent article. I thank everybody for making this article so informative.

I read somewhere that the contribution limit of RRSP is 18 % of the earned income. What does \" earned income\" means? Is it total income or net income with deduction of federal taxes, EI and CPP?

Thanks in advance:)


 
Post ID: 89522 11-11-06 14:00:30
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desiM
Junior Desi
Member since: Nov 06




Posts: 4
Location:


Hello,

This is an excellent article. I thank everybody for making this article so informative.

I read somewhere that the contribution limit of RRSP is 18 % of the earned income. What does \\\" earned income\\\" means? Is it total income or net income with deduction of federal taxes, EI and CPP?

Thanks in advance


 
Post ID: 89730 15-11-06 21:14:20
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reachash
Senior Desi
Member since: Dec 03




Posts: 397
Location: Mississauga


Quote:
Originally posted by desiM

Hello,

This is an excellent article. I thank everybody for making this article so informative.

I read somewhere that the contribution limit of RRSP is 18 % of the earned income. What does \\\" earned income\\\" means? Is it total income or net income with deduction of federal taxes, EI and CPP?

Thanks in advance



18% of gross income or $16500 whichever is lesser...i.e. before tax/EI/CPP...hope this helps....also check following link,

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tax/individuals/topics/rrsp/contributing/limits-e.html

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Last edited by: reachash on 17-11-06 01:25:18
Post ID: 89835 17-11-06 01:22:33
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Mr.Scorpio
Desi
Member since: Jun 04




Posts: 75
Location: Toronto (416-7305795)

RRSP FAQ
RRSPs: Frequently Asked Questions

How have RRSP rules changed? And what exactly is an RRSP?

A Registered Retirement Savings Plan is, as the name suggests, a plan that is registered with the Canada Revenue Agency (formerly known as the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency or Revenue Canada before that) to allow Canadians to save for retirement. They can be set up at most financial institutions.

The RRSP is really nothing more than a special kind of box. It's designed to hold tax-deductible investments in a registered account so they can build tax-free until they're withdrawn. You can have as many RRSPs as you want, although it's better to have fewer for ease of management and to minimize any fees.

Since contributions are tax-deductible, they'll be more valuable to those with higher incomes. Once inside the tax-sheltered environment, the investments can grow faster than they would outside an RRSP, where they would face tax on their gains.

You can put your money into a wide variety of investments GICs, mutual funds, bonds, exchange-traded funds (which track market indices like the S&P/TSX 60 index), mortgage-backed securities, stocks, labour-sponsored funds, and income trusts that invest in everything from oil and gas to peat moss and real estate. And thanks to the federal budget of Feb. 23, 2005, you can even invest in gold and silver bullion and bars. The old foreign content rule, which used to limit the amount of money you could put into foreign investments, was also scrapped in the 2005 budget.

To hold some kinds of investments, you'll need to have a self-directed RRSP. That doesn't mean you have to manage everything yourself. It's just a name for an RRSP that can hold multiple kinds of investments a good way to diversify your investments and lower risk.

If you don't have cash to make a contribution, you can arrange a contribution-in-kind. If you hold securities or Canada Savings Bonds outside your RRSP and don't want to sell them, you can put them directly into your RRSP and get a tax deduction for their current value. Note that if the security has increased in value from when you bought it, you must declare a capital gain. But if it's gone down in value, you can't claim a capital loss.

Financial experts always advise people to automatically pay yourself first. In other words, it's easier to put $200 a month into an RRSP than to come up with $2,400 once a year. Monthly saving also allows you to dollar-cost-average your purchases the same $200 will buy more units of a mutual fund when unit prices are low, and fewer units when prices are high.

You can continue to contribute to an RRSP until the end of the year in which you turn 69, provided you still have earned income. At that time, you must convert your RRSP into a Registered Retirement Income Fund (the most popular option), buy an annuity, or withdraw it in cash (generally not a good idea as you'll pay tax on the whole amount and won't have a retirement income).

As to what you should invest in, consult a financial adviser. If you don't have a company pension plan, you may want to be more conservative. If you're not far from retirement, you may also want to be more conservative. The choice is yours. Be sure you know what your risk tolerance is.

What's the deadline?

There is none. All right, that's a bit of a trick question. You can make a contribution at any time. The only RRSP deadline you face is if you want the tax break applied to your 2005 income. In that case, the deadline is midnight, Wednesday, March 1. But you can always carry forward unused RRSP contribution room to next year, or the year after that, and so on.

The thing about an annual carry-forward, of course, is that they can quickly mushroom into a mountain of room that will stay unused unless you win a lottery or get an inheritance. If you can't muster $2,000 this year, will you be able to find $4,000 next year, or $6,000 the year after that? You can always borrow.

For those with a large amount of contribution room, some banks offer catch-up loans for up to $50,000 over 10 years. Check to see if this is appropriate for you.

How much can I contribute?

For the 2005 tax year, people can contribute up to 18 per cent of their earned income from the previous year, up to a maximum of $16,500;$18,000 for 2006.

But the contribution calculation isn't that simple. From that figure, you must subtract your pension adjustment (PA). If you're a member of a pension plan at work, you'll have a pension adjustment. This amount takes into account the money you and/or your company contributed to an employer-sponsored pension plan. Your T4 slip records the pension adjustment figure.

To this figure, you must then add the total carry-forward of unused RRSP contribution room since 1991. For some taxpayers who haven't been stuffing their RRSPs, this can amount to more than $100,000.

There's an easy way to arrive at this figure without doing all the calculations. Just check the Notice of Assessment you got from the Canada Revenue Agency last year. Or you can phone the tax department's T.I.P.S. line at 1-800-267-6999.

You will be asked to provide your social insurance number, your month and year of birth, and the total income you reported on line 150 of your 2004 return.

As of the end of 2004, Canadians had used only eight per cent of their available RRSP contribution room. Put another way, if we all decided to use up all that contribution room, all at once (more than $330 billion), there's no way Finance Minister Jim Flaherty could bring in a balanced budget.

And while there seems to be enormous pressure for everyone to contribute to RRSPs, there may well be a better use for your money. For those with a lot of high-interest credit card debt, it may be better to pay that off first.

Are RRSPs only for retirement?

While RRSP stands for Registered Retirement Savings Plan, the government has brought in two provisions that allow Canadians to access RRSP money for reasons other than their golden years.

The Home Buyers Plan (HBP) has been enormously popular in Canada, with almost 1.4 million taking advantage of it as of 2004. Since 1992, they've withdrawn more than $14 billion. As long as the money is used to buy a qualifying home, no tax is paid on the withdrawal. The catch is that the money must be repaid to your RRSP over the next 15 years or the minimum annual payment will be added to your income and you will pay tax on that. And because it's a repayment, it's not tax-deductible (you got the tax break the first time you put in the money).

The HBP has been enormously popular in Canada, with more than 1.3 million taking advantage of it as of 2001. The full rules are complex, so check with the Canada Revenue Agency and your financial adviser. A link to the Canada Revenue's HBP site is at the right.

The Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) allows Canadians to pull up to $20,000 from their RRSPs to head back to school. The withdrawals can be for a maximum of $10,000 in any one year and can be spread over four years. Repayment is on a 10-year schedule. Again, familiarize yourself with the rules and limitations and seek financial advice before doing anything.

About 49,000 people have withdrawn $363 million since the LLP began in 1999.

Financial experts also point out that by raiding your RRSP for either of these plans, you lose much of the tax-free compounding you could have made on that money, so you might want to repay the money quicker than the prescribed schedules.

Some people set up RRSPs and withdraw part of it in cash a few years down the road to finance a year of travel. They reason that they got the tax break when they made the contribution, and then will pay less tax on the withdrawal, assuming they have no other income that year. But experts point out that this kind of withdrawal, unlike those made under the HBP or LLP, cannot be made up in future years. Those contributions, and the gains they would have earned, will be lost forever.

Do I really need $1 million to avoid having to eat cat food in retirement?

Retirement becomes a lot easier to afford if you've paid off your mortgage, or if you have a pension plan at work, especially an indexed one that provides guaranteed benefits. But 60 per cent of Canadian workers don't have employer-sponsored pension plans. For those with no retirement income except government benefits, RRSPs and additional saving will make a huge lifestyle difference.

Those on very low incomes should also be aware that RRIF payouts after an RRSP has matured are fully taxable. So those payments may result in a clawback of the Guaranteed Income Supplement given to low-income seniors. So RRSPs may not be the best choice for those at the lowest end of the income spectrum.

Those with retirement incomes above $60,000 should also be aware Old Age Security benefits begin to be clawed back at that level.

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Post ID: 89987 19-11-06 22:55:32
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investpro
Senior Desi
Member since: Nov 06




Posts: 1628
Location: carl sagan's universe


Quote:
Originally posted by Mr.Scorpio

RRSPs: Frequently Asked Questions

How have RRSP rules changed? And what exactly is an RRSP?

How much can I contribute?

For the 2005 tax year, people can contribute up to 18 per cent of their earned income from the previous year, up to a maximum of $16,500;$18,000 for 2006.

But the contribution calculation isn't that simple. From that figure, you must subtract your pension adjustment (PA). If you're a member of a pension plan at work, you'll have a pension adjustment. This amount takes into account the money you and/or your company contributed to an employer-sponsored pension plan. Your T4 slip records the pension adjustment figure.

To this figure, you must then add the total carry-forward of unused RRSP contribution room since 1991. For some taxpayers who haven't been stuffing their RRSPs, this can amount to more than $100,000.


There's an easy way to arrive at this figure without doing all the calculations. Just check the Notice of Assessment you got from the Canada Revenue Agency last year. Or you can phone the tax department's T.I.P.S. line at 1-800-267-6999.

You will be asked to provide your social insurance number, your month and year of birth, and the total income you reported on line 150 of your 2004 return.





Very good point about the pension adj which was not brought up in previous posts. There is also the matter of DPSPs (Deferred Profit Sharing Plans).



 
Last edited by: investpro on 22-11-06 11:47:30
Post ID: 90115 22-11-06 11:46:36
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sallusworld
Desi
Member since: Oct 03




Posts: 79
Location: Toronto

First time home buyer plan
I withdrew about 15k from my RRSP savings account to buy my first house. I know that I have to pay this money back in 15yrs.

Now, I have a group RRSP account with another bank where I invest a percentage of my weekly paycheck into Mutual funds and my employer makes a matching contribution to my amount in the form of the company stocks. For eg - If I invest 2k per year, my employer gives me 1k worth of stocks per yr, this brings the group RRSP contribution to 3k. So, If me and my employer together contribute 3k per yr, then in the next 5 yrs I would reach the 15k limit that I borrowed.

My question is, does this contribution towards group RRSP counts towards paying back the RRSP amount that I borrowed for buying a house? Does it matter if I contribute to a group RRSP account in a different bank rather then the one with whom I had the RRSP savings account?

Thanks in advance.

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Post ID: 92350 29-12-06 21:35:39
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regar
Senior Desi
Member since: Aug 06




Posts: 135
Location:


In RRSP you cannot hold USD

 
Last edited by: regar on 28-12-07 21:18:37
Post ID: 92363 30-12-06 00:59:46
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regar
Senior Desi
Member since: Aug 06




Posts: 135
Location:


RRSP LOAN for the first time home buyers plan.
The amount of 20000 $ that you borrowed is from your account and you have to pay back in 15 equal monthly deposits if in any year you do not pay back the amount(1/15) then it is treated as part of your income that year.
The contribution you are making now is part of your eligible portion based on your previous years income .

This is the tricky part of taking RRSP home buyers loan as you have to make sure to have those funds every year in addition to your other plans for your planing of finances.


 
Last edited by: regar on 28-12-07 21:14:35
Post ID: 92364 30-12-06 01:06:16
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parth1970
Senior Desi
Member since: Jan 06




Posts: 174
Location: Brampton


Very helpfully and informative topic, I think Canadian Desi is different than other country. They are more with helping nature than other country I have had experience.

Thank you, Wish you happy New Year!


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Post ID: 92365 30-12-06 01:10:36
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sallusworld
Desi
Member since: Oct 03




Posts: 79
Location: Toronto

First time home buyers plan
Quote:
Originally posted by regar

RRSP LOAN for the first time home buyers plan.
The amount of 15000 $ that you borrowed is from your account and you have to pay back in 15 equal monthly deposits if in any year you do not pay back the amount(1/15) then it is treated as part of your income that year.
The contribution you are making now is part of your eligible portion based on your previous years income .

This is the tricky part of taking RRSP home buyers loan as you have to make sure to have those funds every year in addition to your other plans for your planing of finances.



Thanks for your reply. Does it mean that I have to put $15k/15 = $1k every year for 15 yrs in my RRSP Savings account?(which is by the way with ING as they give good interest rates, I was planning to buy a house and hence I decided to open a RRSP savings account instead of self direct trading account or long term GIC). Is it possible that I can transfer my RRSP account to another bank eg ICICI bank and then pay 15k in to this account so that I get better interest rate or can I open a new RRSP self direct trading account with TDwaterhouse or Scotia Mcleod etc and pay the 15k to this account?

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Post ID: 92490 02-01-07 00:39:02
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