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  Canada Immigration Forum > About Canada > Accounting and Taxation > CPP question
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CPP question




A question to the tax experts in this forum :
I have got an opportunity to work in US and get paid out of US payroll. I will still be a Canadian resident and will be filing for Canadian taxes. However, I am not sure how CPP will be considered. Since I am not likely to have an employer contribution, I wont be contributing to CPP. Will this affect my CPP payments when I hit 65/70?

I do have a work history of almost 15 years in Canada.

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"The grass is not, in fact, always greener on the other side of the fence. Fences have nothing to do with it. The grass is greenest where it is watered. When crossing over fences, carry water with you and tend the grass wherever you may be"

 
Timon

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Member since: Mar 04
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Location: Greater Toronto Area

Post ID: 235669 21-07-17 19:01:59
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pendse
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Member since: Jun 17




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Nope. CPP won't be affected.

Whatever you & your employer have contributed so far will be given back to you.

The more years you work & the more CPP you pay, the more you will get back. And vice versa.

How much & How long you have contributed will decide how much CPP you will get on retirement.


 
Post ID: 235672 22-07-17 00:24:59
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Timon
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Member since: Mar 04




Posts: 297
Location: Greater Toronto Area


Thanks for the response. So, time I work for the US employer and paid out of US, I wont be contributing to CPP and hence, this will affect my eventual CPP payout.
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"The grass is not, in fact, always greener on the other side of the fence. Fences have nothing to do with it. The grass is greenest where it is watered. When crossing over fences, carry water with you and tend the grass wherever you may be"

 
Post ID: 235673 22-07-17 09:43:28
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pendse
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Quote:
Originally posted by Timon

Thanks for the response. So, time I work for the US employer and paid out of US, I wont be contributing to CPP and hence, this will affect my eventual CPP payout.



Yes.

But your OAS & GIS payments won't be affected. You will get the same when you turn 65 from the Canadian gov.

You & your employer contribute towards CPP, so it depends on how much your contribution is over the years. But OAS & GIS , you don't contribute it remains the same, it just depends upon how long you have lived in Canada.


 
Post ID: 235674 22-07-17 09:52:20
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Full House
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You will have a good Pension and Oldage Benefits coming to you and others in y--
You will have a good Pension and Oldage Benefits coming to you and others in your retirement years. They have planned all of these very well. More on it under this. There is even more to explore after you read this, so do not stop just there. Keep on top of this subject matter, because this is just getting started for everyone and they better get in on it right from the start of things.

You have lived here are and worked all your life and contributed to the CPP and will also get OAS. Here is an approximation as to what to expect at the age of 65, if you you want to throw in the towel and RETIRE.

BUT**..: There is a great big deduction is thrown in so do not get too worried about the taxes etc., now . There are a few breaks that they have thrown in it too. For that you will have to know the tax system and how it is Indexed and will work in the future years.

So, the tables and the approximation will all be out of kilt and what ever that we are calculating here today will all get thrown out off the window. Yet it will be good to know what it is that you can expect when you will be 65.

Currently there is a clawback around $74,000, hopefully the ceiling will inch upwards too.
EDIT**
For 2016, the threshold is $73,756. The amount of the clawback is equal to your OAS payments or 15% of the amount by which your net income exceeds the threshold, whichever is less.

https://srv111.services.gc.ca/cpp/index

CRA sets the max salary for CPP contributions. An article worth reading today.
http://www.advisor.ca/tax/tax-news/cra-announces-2017-maximum-pensionable-earnings-218748

TORONTO STAR..:
https://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/2013/02/07/cpp_5_things_you_need_to_know.html

WHAT IS TO COME.

TRICKY TRICKY..:
https://www.investorsgroup.com/en/advice-and-stories/work

5 Things Your Business Needs to Know About Future CPP Changes. BY INVESTORS GROUP / JANUARY 2017

Significant changes to the Canada Pension Plan come into effect in 2019. Start getting ready now.

Despite having to pay more for CPP, companies should aim to keep their group RRSP or private sector pension plans.

In 2019, new CPP rules will come into force. While that may still seem like a long time away, business owners impacted by the new enhancements need to start planning for the changes today. If you are a small business owner, nows the time to start thinking about how this will impact your company, says Dan Kelly, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation for Independent Business, which represents more than 100,000 small- and medium-sized businesses.

whats changing?

The first thing business owners need to do is to become familiar with the new rules. The proposed amendments will allow retired Canadians to receive higher CPP benefits than they do now. Currently, the CPP retirement benefit is 25% of a workers average adjusted earnings. With the amendments, this will increase to 33%.

Two types of contribution increases will be phased in:

Starting in 2019 and ending in 2023, there will be a phased-in increase of 1% in the employee and employer contribution rates, which is currently 4.95% of earnings. By 2023, the employee contribution percentage will be 5.95%, paid on earnings between $3,500 and an upper limit known as the years maximum pensionable earnings, or YMPE. An employee earning $50,000 a year will contribute nearly $500 more annually in 2023 and future years, while an employer will pay a similar amount per employee.

Starting in 2024, there will be an increase in the maximum amount of earnings that are subject to CPP. This will be phased in over two years: the maximum will go up 7% in 2024 and another 7% in 2025, for a total increase of 14%. Employees and employers will contribute an additional 4.0% on whatever they earn between the YMPE and this new upper earnings limit, which is projected to be $82,700 in 2025.

A person with $50,000 of constant earnings during his or her working life will receive an annual CPP benefit that is about $4,000 higher (in 2016 dollars) than what they would receive in 2016. Businesses with several employees could end up paying a lot more. Heres how owners can prepare for the new rules.

Determine how you will pay for the increases

Employers should conduct detailed projections to estimate what their additional costs will be during the phase-in period and into the future. Will it affect your ability to hire or give your employees raises? If you have a defined benefit plan for your employees and its integrated with the CPP system, will you need to change your benefit formulas? Some businesses have told us that the additional contributions will come out of employee compensation in some way, says Kelly.

Dont abandon your employee retirement savings plan

Despite having to pay more for CPP, companies should aim to keep their group RRSP or private sector pension plans. If a business drops its plan in response to CPP changes, it may lose something that has been helpful in attracting and retaining its workforce, Kelly says. The CPP changes affect all employers, so getting rid of your employee pension plan will work against you if you are trying to distinguish your business.


Make sure your employees understand the changes

Its important that employees understand the changes before they come into effect, because come January 1, 2019, they will see their earnings drop unless their employer decides to make up the difference. They should also understand that because the increased CPP benefits take 40 years to completely kick in, they may, depending on their age, benefit very little from the changes.

Consider a third-party payroll service

Because calculating CPP deductions will become more complicated once the changes are in effect, even small businesses that normally handle their own payroll may want to outsource the job to a payroll company. It will be trickier than in years past because there will be five years of a premium increase, and then an increase in the upper earnings limit for two years after that, says Kelly.

More CPP for self employed

Be aware that you pay both the employee and the employer CPP contributions for your business. If you earn $50,000 a year, you will pay about an additional $1,000. Depending on your circumstances, you may need to sell more of your personal services or products to accommodate this increase.

You should read the link here to get to know more about the Canada US cross border Social Security Agreements that they have here. It is a ball of wool of a different colour and it needs a lot of analysis and Interpretations. Little too complicated for starters. But it is there for you to EXPLORE here.

Enjoy.

FH.

Edit..: https://retirehappy.ca/social-security-agreements-cpp-oas/

2nd Edit. : They are reducing the eligibility age to 65 from 67 and that will enable you to enjoy it earlier and also calculate the payouts sooner.
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Quote:
Originally posted by Timon

A question to the tax experts in this forum :
I have got an opportunity to work in US and get paid out of US payroll. I will still be a Canadian resident and will be filing for Canadian taxes. However, I am not sure how CPP will be considered. Since I am not likely to have an employer contribution, I wont be contributing to CPP. Will this affect my CPP payments when I hit 65/70?

I do have a work history of almost 15 years in Canada.





 
Last edited by: Full House on 23-07-17 21:53:52
Post ID: 235677 22-07-17 17:18:41
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