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WHODATHUNKIT




Winning recipe. BUTTER CHICKEN LASAGNE.
Rick Matharu's butter chicken lasagne recipe. Mmmmm GOOD.!

TORONTO — A Brampton man is $250,000 richer after his recipe won the grand prize on the Food Network Canada show Recipe to Riches.

Rick Matharu received the highest number of online votes from Canadians for his Butter Chicken Lasagna on the season finale of the competitive reality series Wednesday night.

“I just want to thank Canada for this amazing opportunity. It’s a dream come true for me and it wouldn’t be possible without the support of Canada, so thank you,” a jubilant Matharu said from his home Thursday.

What will they think of,,NEXT?
Anybody wants to come up with a good one!!

FH.

https://www.therecord.com/living-story/2628758-butter-chicken-lasagna-recipe-nets-ontario-man-grand-prize-in-tv-contest/


 
Full House

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Post ID: 237332 30-10-18 21:56:44
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Full House
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ONE WHO HAS ALL THE INTELLIGENCE RULES. THE ONE WITH ALL OF THE DATA HAS INTELLIGENCE.

WHAT IS THE REASON FOR ALL OF THIS HAPPENING. IS IT REALLY TRUE AND IF SO, IS IT NEEDED THAT ALL OF THE ACTIONS BETAKEN? THEN WHAT? G5 PHONES COULD BE THE REASON?

The 6 reasons why Huawei gives the US and its allies security nightmares...
The biggest fear is that China could exploit the telecom giant’s gear to wreak havoc in a crisis.

The detention in Canada of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s CFO and the daughter of its founder, is further inflaming tensions between the US and China. Her arrest is linked to a US extradition request. On December 7 a Canadian court heard that the request relates to Huawei's alleged use of Skycom Tech, a company that dealt with Iranian telecom firms, to sell equipment to Iran between 2009 and 2014 in contravention of US sanctions on the country. China says her detention is a human rights violation and is demanding her swift release.


Canada has arrested Huawei’s CFO for extradition to the US


Behind this very public drama is a long-running, behind-the-scenes one centered on Western intelligence agencies’ fears that Huawei poses a significant threat to global security. Among the spooks’ biggest concerns:

There could be “kill switches” in Huawei equipment …

The Chinese firm is the world’s largest manufacturer of things like base stations and antennas that mobile operators use to run wireless networks. And those networks carry data that’s used to help control power grids, financial markets, transport systems, and other parts of countries’ vital infrastructure. The fear is that China’s military and intelligence services could insert software or hardware “back doors” into Huawei’s gear that they could exploit to degrade or disable foreign wireless networks in the event of a crisis. This has led to moves in the US to block Chinese equipment from being used.

... that even close inspections miss

Since 2010, the UK has been running a special center, whose staff includes members of its GCHQ signal intelligence agency, to vet Huawei gear before it’s deployed. But earlier this year, it warned that it had “only limited assurance” that the company’s equipment didn’t pose a security threat. According to press reports, the center had found that some of Huawei’s code behaved differently on actual networks from the way it did when it was tested, and that some of its software suppliers weren’t subject to rigorous controls.

Back doors could be used for data snooping

Huawei claims its equipment connects over a third of the world’s population. It’s also handling vast amounts of data for businesses. That’s why there’s fear in Western intelligence circles that back doors could be used to tap into sensitive information using the firm’s equipment. This would be tricky to do undetected, but not impossible. Huawei doesn’t just build equipment; it can also connect to it wirelessly to issue upgrades and patches to fix bugs. There’s concern that this remote connectivity could be exploited by Chinese cyber spies.

The company is also one of the world’s biggest makers of smartphones and other consumer devices, which has raised the prospect that China might exploit these products for espionage. In May, the US Department of Defense ordered retail stores on US military bases to stop selling phones from Huawei and ZTE, another big Chinese tech giant, because of fears they could be hacked to reveal the locations and movements of military personnel.

The rollout of 5G wireless networks will make everything worse

Telecom companies around the world are about to roll out the next generation of cellular wireless, known as 5G. As well as speeding up data transfers, 5G networks will enable self-driving cars to talk to each other and to things like smart traffic lights. They’ll also connect and control a vast number of robots in factories and other locations. And the military will use them for all kinds of applications, too. This will dramatically expand the number of connected devices—and the chaos that can be caused if the networks supporting them are hacked. It will also ramp up the amount of corporate and other data that hackers can target. Both Australia and New Zealand have recently banned the use of Huawei equipment in new 5G wireless infrastructure. This week, the UK's BT followed suit.

Chinese firms will ship tech to countries in defiance of a US trade embargo

The US has been investigating claims that Huawei shipped products with US tech components to Iran and other countries subject to a US embargo. In the court hearing, a lawyer for the Canadian government said that Ms Meng is accused of telling US bankers there was no connection between Skycom and Huawei, when in fact there was. The alleged fraud caused the banks to make transactions that violated US sanctions against Iran. Chinese officials have repeatedly said they don’t consider China's companies to be bound by other nations’ trade edicts.

Huawei isn’t as immune to Chinese government influence as it claims to be

Huawei has repeatedly stressed it’s a private company that’s owned by its employees. The implication is that it has no incentive to cause customers to lose confidence in the integrity of its products. On the other hand, its governance structures are still something of a mystery, and its founder, Ren Zhengfei, who was once an officer in the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, keeps a low profile. Such things “make you question just how much independence it really has,” says Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

In its defense, Huawei can point to the fact that no security researchers have found back doors in its products. “There’s all this concern, but there’s never been a smoking gun,” says Paul Triolo of the Eurasia Group. While that’s true, it won’t change the view of the US, which is stepping up its efforts to persuade its allies to keep Huawei out of all their networks.

This story was updated on December 7 to include details of a court hearing in Canada about Ms Meng's detention.

IF THE OUTCOME IS GOING TO BE A SINGLE SENTENCE FOR 30 YEARS IN PRISON? ARE THESE JOBS WORTH IT? DO THEY PAY YOU AND KEEP YOU GOING AND YOUR FAMILY GOING AT THE SAME TIME? OR THEY ARE LEFT TO FEND FOR THEMSELVES AND STARVE?

FH.


 
Post ID: 237411 08-12-18 18:57:41
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Full House
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msn news

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, sits beside a translator during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Dec. 7, 2018.

To get your head around what’s really going on with the ominous Vancouver arrest and detention of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Chinese telecom behemoth Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, it will help to be disabused of what the story isn’t about.

This is not merely a case of Canada being dragged into an unseemly trade-war street fight that has lately flared up between two belligerent hegemons, Xi Jinping’s China and Donald Trump’s America. Another stupidity making the rounds would have you believe that Beijing’s hysterical, spittle-flecked threats to retaliate against Canada can be explained away as a matter of the Chinese ruling class simply not knowing how things are done in countries governed by due process and the rule of law.

Beijing knows perfectly well that Canada is acting on a perfectly legitimate request from the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs in accordance with the relevant terms of a long-standing, tried and tested extradition treaty. An evidence-rich Aug. 22 arrest warrant requires Meng to appear in a U.S. court to answer criminal charges that she committed fraud against U.S. banks by concealing Huawei’s connections to a Huawei proxy in Tehran that was doing business with Iranian telecom firms, in violation of U.S. sanctions law. She was picked up on a flight stopover at Vancouver International Airport.

Meng is the daughter of Huawei’s billionaire founder and president Ren Zhengfei, a former People’s Liberation Army officer with close ties to Beijing’s Communist Party bosses, so it only follows that Beijing would be attentive to her every need and worry. Meng also happens to have been a permanent resident of Canada some years ago, when she could be counted among the 30,000 or so Chinese wealth migrants whose quasi-legal deluge of investments in Vancouver real estate has played such a significant part in hideously distorting Vancouver’s housing market.

What distinguishes Meng’s case is that it is one of those rare occasions, if she is eventually found guilty of the charges against her, that a prison term may result from a conviction for evading sanctions specifically intended to isolate a belligerent police state. It is no coincidence that it was the Brooklyn U.S. attorney’s office that was undertaking the criminal investigation of Huawei, and issued the warrant for Meng’s arrest. HSBC, one of the main banks Meng is alleged to have conned into acting as a conduit for dirty Iranian money, was busted by the Brooklyn office back in 2012.

READ MORE: Chinese Huawei executive arrested in Canada accused of fraud over Iran sanctions

HSBC was fined $1.92 billion for laundering billions in drug money and conducting illegal transactions with Libya, Cuba, Sudan and Burma. Part of the settlement deal required a stringent monitoring of HSBC’s transactions over a five-year period. If the monitoring was effective, it would have picked up Meng’s sketchy dealings.

Controversially, settlement deals like the HSBC arrangement became the norm in the United States during the Obama administration. Trump carried it on in the deal his administration struck earlier this year with ZTE Corp., another dodgy Chinese telecom. Last year, ZTE pleaded guilty to selling American equipment to Iran, eventually paying $1.89 million to get a total ban on its American business lifted. Just last month, the French bank Societe Generale agreed to pay $1.34 billion to settle sanctions-busting proceedings against the company involving 2,500 transactions with entities in Iran, Cuba and Sudan over a 10-year period.

Also Watch: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou's bail hearing draws crowds, media (Video provided by CBC)

{{{{Nobody went to jail in those cases, and that may be crude justice, but Meng’s appearance in a Vancouver courtroom last week was not a “show trial,” as the Communist Party megaphone China Daily ludicrously claims. It was a bail hearing, at which her lawyer offered up two occasionally-occupied Vancouver mansions as surety.

Neither was her arrest a “kidnapping,” as the Chinese commerce department bureaucrat Wei Xinyu claimed in the party-owned newspaper Global Times. In the most comically intemperate language, Chinese diplomats have demanded that Canada release Meng immediately, to assuage China’s “hurt feelings.” Over the weekend, China’s deputy foreign minister Le Yucheng threatened Canadians with “serious consequences” unless we do what we’re told.

They should all be told to pound sand, of course, but it is perfectly understandable that Beijing would feel free to take this sort of tone. Among the G7 countries, Canada has adopted a uniquely supine posture in its relations with Beijing and its legions of creepy billionaires. Unlike Canada, our partners in the “Five Eyes” intelligence alliance—the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom—have not been slobbering on Huawei’s slippers all these years.}}}}

It was long before Trump came along that a bipartisan consensus had established itself in Washington that Huawei—beholden to the Communist Party as all Chinese corporations are, by law—posed a particularly serious national security threat. The Obama administration adopted strict measures to quarantine Huawei, and there’s nothing new about the Shenzhen-based conglomerate’s shady dealings in Iran, either. In 2012, Zaeim Electronic Industries, Huawei’s Iranian partners, listed Iran’s defence ministry, the regime’s intelligence branch and the terrorist-listed Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps among its clients.

Australia and New Zealand are intent on barring Huawei equipment from their fifth-generation (“5G”) internet development. Only last week, British Telecom confirmed that Huawei gear will not be permitted in any of its emerging 5G technology. BT is already stripping Huawei equipment from core areas of its 4G networks following warnings from the U.K.’s cyber-security offices and MI6, the U.K.’s foreign intelligence service.

Japan is excluding Huawei and ZTE from public procurement, and last month the European Union adopted a draft law that would restrict Chinese investments in areas that impinge upon national security. “We are determined to keep our technology sectors and key infrastructure safe,” says Austria’s Margarete Schramboeck, who holds the EU’s rotating presidential office.

In stark contrast, Canada has welcomed Huawei with open arms, direct subsidies and tax credits, and in return, after having arrived in Canada only a decade ago, Huawei has deftly insinuated itself into the good graces of Canada’s political class. Huawei has embedded itself in research programs in 10 Canadian universities. Telus and Bell have both taken Huawei on as a partner in the development of 5G technologies. Huawei is now the presenting sponsor of Hockey Night in Canada.

Earlier this year, Jake Enwright left his post as Conservative leader Andrew Scheer’s communications director to take up a more lucrative position as Huawei’s director of corporate affairs in Canada. Long-time Liberal Scott Bradley, the Liberal Party’s candidate in Ottawa Centre in 2011, is Huawei Canada’s vice-president for corporate affairs. Bradley is also a director of the Canada-China Business Council (CCBC), which serves Canadian businesses in China as assiduously as it serves China’s business interests in Canada.

Huawei is one of CCBC’s “benefactor” members. Another CCBC director is former Liberal cabinet minister Martin Cauchon, who rather inauspiciously greeted news of the Ontario government’s $6.5 million gift to Huawei in 2011 with these words: “There is a saying that if you can’t beat them, join them.”

Canada has joined them, alright—despite the warnings of U.S. intelligence agencies, former Canadian Security Intelligence Service directors Richard Fadden and Ward Elcock, and John Adams, former head of the Communications Security Establishment, among many others. Over the weekend, Fadden said this about Huawei, on CTV’s Question Period: “I believe they’re acting as an agent of the Chinese state.” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says hey, no worries, we’re monitoring Huawei.

There is a silver lining in this, however. Former Liberal deputy prime minister John Manley is not Canada’s foreign affairs minister.

Manley’s response to the hullabaloo in that Vancouver courtroom last week was to say Canada should have skipped the whole thing by employing some “creative incompetence” in the U.S. extradition request for Meng Wanzhou. “This woman was not residing in Canada, she was simply transferring flights in Canada, and we might have just missed her.”

So much for DUE PROCESS FOR CHINA AND THE U.S.

FH.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx


 
Post ID: 237416 11-12-18 01:45:05
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Full House
Senior Desi
Member since: Oct 12




Posts: 2481
Location:



msn news

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, sits beside a translator during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Dec. 7, 2018.

To get your head around what’s really going on with the ominous Vancouver arrest and detention of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Chinese telecom behemoth Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, it will help to be disabused of what the story isn’t about.

This is not merely a case of Canada being dragged into an unseemly trade-war street fight that has lately flared up between two belligerent hegemons, Xi Jinping’s China and Donald Trump’s America. Another stupidity making the rounds would have you believe that Beijing’s hysterical, spittle-flecked threats to retaliate against Canada can be explained away as a matter of the Chinese ruling class simply not knowing how things are done in countries governed by due process and the rule of law.

Beijing knows perfectly well that Canada is acting on a perfectly legitimate request from the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs in accordance with the relevant terms of a long-standing, tried and tested extradition treaty. An evidence-rich Aug. 22 arrest warrant requires Meng to appear in a U.S. court to answer criminal charges that she committed fraud against U.S. banks by concealing Huawei’s connections to a Huawei proxy in Tehran that was doing business with Iranian telecom firms, in violation of U.S. sanctions law. She was picked up on a flight stopover at Vancouver International Airport.

Meng is the daughter of Huawei’s billionaire founder and president Ren Zhengfei, a former People’s Liberation Army officer with close ties to Beijing’s Communist Party bosses, so it only follows that Beijing would be attentive to her every need and worry. Meng also happens to have been a permanent resident of Canada some years ago, when she could be counted among the 30,000 or so Chinese wealth migrants whose quasi-legal deluge of investments in Vancouver real estate has played such a significant part in hideously distorting Vancouver’s housing market.

What distinguishes Meng’s case is that it is one of those rare occasions, if she is eventually found guilty of the charges against her, that a prison term may result from a conviction for evading sanctions specifically intended to isolate a belligerent police state. It is no coincidence that it was the Brooklyn U.S. attorney’s office that was undertaking the criminal investigation of Huawei, and issued the warrant for Meng’s arrest. HSBC, one of the main banks Meng is alleged to have conned into acting as a conduit for dirty Iranian money, was busted by the Brooklyn office back in 2012.

READ MORE: Chinese Huawei executive arrested in Canada accused of fraud over Iran sanctions

HSBC was fined $1.92 billion for laundering billions in drug money and conducting illegal transactions with Libya, Cuba, Sudan and Burma. Part of the settlement deal required a stringent monitoring of HSBC’s transactions over a five-year period. If the monitoring was effective, it would have picked up Meng’s sketchy dealings.

Controversially, settlement deals like the HSBC arrangement became the norm in the United States during the Obama administration. Trump carried it on in the deal his administration struck earlier this year with ZTE Corp., another dodgy Chinese telecom. Last year, ZTE pleaded guilty to selling American equipment to Iran, eventually paying $1.89 million to get a total ban on its American business lifted. Just last month, the French bank Societe Generale agreed to pay $1.34 billion to settle sanctions-busting proceedings against the company involving 2,500 transactions with entities in Iran, Cuba and Sudan over a 10-year period.

Also Watch: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou's bail hearing draws crowds, media (Video provided by CBC)

{{{{Nobody went to jail in those cases, and that may be crude justice, but Meng’s appearance in a Vancouver courtroom last week was not a “show trial,” as the Communist Party megaphone China Daily ludicrously claims. It was a bail hearing, at which her lawyer offered up two occasionally-occupied Vancouver mansions as surety.

Neither was her arrest a “kidnapping,” as the Chinese commerce department bureaucrat Wei Xinyu claimed in the party-owned newspaper Global Times. In the most comically intemperate language, Chinese diplomats have demanded that Canada release Meng immediately, to assuage China’s “hurt feelings.” Over the weekend, China’s deputy foreign minister Le Yucheng threatened Canadians with “serious consequences” unless we do what we’re told.

They should all be told to pound sand, of course, but it is perfectly understandable that Beijing would feel free to take this sort of tone. Among the G7 countries, Canada has adopted a uniquely supine posture in its relations with Beijing and its legions of creepy billionaires. Unlike Canada, our partners in the “Five Eyes” intelligence alliance—the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom—have not been slobbering on Huawei’s slippers all these years.}}}}

It was long before Trump came along that a bipartisan consensus had established itself in Washington that Huawei—beholden to the Communist Party as all Chinese corporations are, by law—posed a particularly serious national security threat. The Obama administration adopted strict measures to quarantine Huawei, and there’s nothing new about the Shenzhen-based conglomerate’s shady dealings in Iran, either. In 2012, Zaeim Electronic Industries, Huawei’s Iranian partners, listed Iran’s defence ministry, the regime’s intelligence branch and the terrorist-listed Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps among its clients.

Australia and New Zealand are intent on barring Huawei equipment from their fifth-generation (“5G”) internet development. Only last week, British Telecom confirmed that Huawei gear will not be permitted in any of its emerging 5G technology. BT is already stripping Huawei equipment from core areas of its 4G networks following warnings from the U.K.’s cyber-security offices and MI6, the U.K.’s foreign intelligence service.

Japan is excluding Huawei and ZTE from public procurement, and last month the European Union adopted a draft law that would restrict Chinese investments in areas that impinge upon national security. “We are determined to keep our technology sectors and key infrastructure safe,” says Austria’s Margarete Schramboeck, who holds the EU’s rotating presidential office.

In stark contrast, Canada has welcomed Huawei with open arms, direct subsidies and tax credits, and in return, after having arrived in Canada only a decade ago, Huawei has deftly insinuated itself into the good graces of Canada’s political class. Huawei has embedded itself in research programs in 10 Canadian universities. Telus and Bell have both taken Huawei on as a partner in the development of 5G technologies. Huawei is now the presenting sponsor of Hockey Night in Canada.

Earlier this year, Jake Enwright left his post as Conservative leader Andrew Scheer’s communications director to take up a more lucrative position as Huawei’s director of corporate affairs in Canada. Long-time Liberal Scott Bradley, the Liberal Party’s candidate in Ottawa Centre in 2011, is Huawei Canada’s vice-president for corporate affairs. Bradley is also a director of the Canada-China Business Council (CCBC), which serves Canadian businesses in China as assiduously as it serves China’s business interests in Canada.

Huawei is one of CCBC’s “benefactor” members. Another CCBC director is former Liberal cabinet minister Martin Cauchon, who rather inauspiciously greeted news of the Ontario government’s $6.5 million gift to Huawei in 2011 with these words: “There is a saying that if you can’t beat them, join them.”

Canada has joined them, alright—despite the warnings of U.S. intelligence agencies, former Canadian Security Intelligence Service directors Richard Fadden and Ward Elcock, and John Adams, former head of the Communications Security Establishment, among many others. Over the weekend, Fadden said this about Huawei, on CTV’s Question Period: “I believe they’re acting as an agent of the Chinese state.” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says hey, no worries, we’re monitoring Huawei.

There is a silver lining in this, however. Former Liberal deputy prime minister John Manley is not Canada’s foreign affairs minister.

Manley’s response to the hullabaloo in that Vancouver courtroom last week was to say Canada should have skipped the whole thing by employing some “creative incompetence” in the U.S. extradition request for Meng Wanzhou. “This woman was not residing in Canada, she was simply transferring flights in Canada, and we might have just missed her.”

So much for DUE PROCESS FOR CHINA AND THE U.S.

FH.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx


 
Post ID: 237417 11-12-18 01:45:06
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Full House
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What will they think next.?!
xx

A Chinese internet technology company has announced a plan to provide free satellite internet worldwide by 2026, joining companies like SpaceX, Facebook and Google in the mission to run a global internet service.

Key points:
LinkSure will use 272 satellites at different orbits and heights to provide the service. Facebook, SpaceX, and Google all have plans to provide global services with satellites Beijing has been attempting to increase global connectivity as part of its 'Digital Silk Road. Shanghai-based company LinkSure Network, which says its mission is to bridge the world's digital inequalities, unveiled on Tuesday the first satellite in their ambitious plan to ensure that everyone in the world can access the internet free of charge.

The plan — dubbed the "LinkSure Swarm Constellation System" — would see 272 satellites set at different orbits and heights in order to span the entire globe.

The first satellite, LinkSure No 1, is set to launch in north-west China in 2019 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre as part of the payload on board one of China's Long March rockets.

Ten further satellites will be sent into orbit by 2020.

The news went viral in China on social media site Weibo, thrilling many Chinese netizens.

I am thrilled too. Aren't you?
---
FH.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-30/chinese-company-to-provide-free-internet-worldwide-by-2026/10568434


 
Post ID: 237420 11-12-18 23:13:31
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Full House
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Tues., Dec. 11, 2018
VANCOUVER—Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou has been released on bail.

The decision set off a burst of applause in Vancouver’s B.C. Supreme Court, where arguments for and against her release were heard over three days.

A courtroom sketch shows Meng Wanzhou, left, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, speaking to her lawyer, David Martin, during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Monday.
A courtroom sketch shows Meng Wanzhou, left, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, speaking to her lawyer, David Martin, during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Monday. (JANE WOLSAK / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

The telecom executive was released on $10-million bail: $7 million in cash and a $3-million surety made up of property from four associates. She will remain in Vancouver, where she owns two homes, while she awaits extradition proceedings.

She is ordered to stay inside her home on West 28th Ave. from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m. and be subject to 24-hour-a-day monitoring by both a live security detail and electronic ankle bracelet. She must pay for the cost of her security monitoring.

Meng must surrender her passports but is allowed to travel within Vancouver, the North Shore and a portion of Richmond excluding the airport.

Meng smiled and nodded at her husband after the judge finished reading his decision, wiping a tear from her eye. Earlier, she had told her lawyer that upon her release, her “only simple goal” is to be with her husband and daughter.


FH.

https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/2018/12/11/bail-hearing-for-huawei-exec-goes-to-day-three-after-unusual-arguments-on-gps-monitoring-device.html


 
Post ID: 237421 11-12-18 23:24:15
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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxPLEASE READ THE COMPLETE PICTORIAL THROUGH THE LINK AT THE BOTTOM.
(Some time in the future the LINK will not open and at that time you can read the write up here)


Huawei exec committed fraud by deceiving multiple banks: Crown.. : Updated: December 10, 2018

A federal Crown prosecutor says a senior Huawei Technologies executive who was arrested in Vancouver and is being sought for extradition to the U.S. committed multiple acts of fraud against financial institutions and should be denied bail.

John Gibb-Carsley, a lawyer with the federal Justice Department, urged a judge on Friday to deny bail to Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of the Chinese tech giant. The case is to continue on Monday.

Gibb-Carsley told B.C. Supreme Court Justice William Ehrcke that Meng has no meaningful connections to Canada and has vast resources and is a serious flight risk.

“At the starting point, there is an incentive to flee. Ms. Meng is charged with conspiracy to defraud multiple international financial institutions. It is a serious offence, with each offence carrying a maximum of 30 years in prison.”

In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, back right, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, sits beside a translator during a bail hearing at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. Jane Wolsak / THE CANADIAN PRESS

She was arrested Saturday after an extradition request from the United States while in transit at the city’s airport.Gibb-Carsley said Meng has “significant” financial resources that would enable her to leave the country if she is granted bail and noted that her father, the founder of the company, is worth about $3.2 billion.

“She has the means to flee and to remain outside Canada. Her ordinary home is in a country without an extradition treaty with U.S.,” said the Crown lawyer.

GALLERY:

Photos: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou's B.C. Supreme Court hearing

People leave the B.C. Supreme Court on December 07 2018 after the bail hearing for Huawei's M..

In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, left, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies...

Liu Xiaozong, husband of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei's chief financial officer, leaves a B.C. courthouse...

A woman holds up a sign in support of Huawei at a B.C. courthouse prior to the bail hearing for...

Scott Bradley (L), Vice-President Corporate Affairs of Huawei Technologies, exits during a recess in...
A protester outside Wanzhou Meng's bail hearing at Supreme Court in Vancouvery, BC., December...

Members of the media crowd around an unidentified woman who was attending a bail hearing for...

Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, left, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies,...

Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a...
Media assemble outside BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, where a bail hearing was being held for...

Observers stand outside the B.C. Supreme Courthouse as they wait for news at the bail hearing for...
Dec. 5, 2018 - A top executive with a major Chinese tech company has been arrested in Vancouver...
An unidentified man shows something on a smartphone to a sheriff while waiting to enter a...

Two unidentified men speak with a sheriff while waiting to enter a courtroom to attend a bail...

People wait in line to attend the bail hearing of Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng...

Members of the media wait outside B.C. Supreme Court as a bail hearing is held inside for Meng...

A man takes a photograph with a smartphone while waiting in line to enter a courtroom to attend a...
A sheriff watches proceedings inside the B.C. Supreme Courthouse as Huawei Technologies Chief...

In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, back right, the chief financial officer of Huawei...

People leave the B.C. Supreme Court on December 07 2018 after the bail hearing for Huawei's Meng...
People leave the B.C. Supreme Court on December 07 2018 after the bail hearing for Huawei's Meng...
People leave the B.C. Supreme Court on December 07 2018 after the bail hearing for Huawei's Meng...
In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, left, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies...

On Dec. 1, Meng was arrested at Vancouver International Airport after arriving from China on her way to Mexico.
Canadian officials, using a provisional arrest warrant that was issued by a New York state judge in August, took her into custody.
Gibb-Carsley said that at the heart of the allegations against Huawei and Meng is that between 2009 and 2014, the company used an unofficial subsidiary named Skycom to transact business in Iran for an Iranian telecommunications company, in violation of U.S. sanctions against trade with Iran.

When a Reuters news agency story was published in 2013 describing how Huawei controlled Skycom and that Skycom had attempted to send U.S.-manufactured computer equipment to Iran in violation of the sanctions, several banks involved in the case asked Huawei whether the allegations were true.

Members of the media and public line up to enter a courtroom to attend a bail hearing for Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, on Friday December 7, 2018. She was arrested Saturday after an extradition request from the United States while in transit at the city’s airport. Darryl Dyck / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Meng then made misrepresentations to the banks in a form of “damage control” to the news agency’s article, Gibb-Carsley alleged.

Relying on the misrepresentations by Meng and other Huawei representatives, one of the banks and its U.S subsidiary cleared more than $100 million dollars worth of transactions related to Skycom through the U.S. between 2010 and 2014, said Gibb-Carsley.

“Skycom was Huawei. This is the crux of the alleged misrepresentation. This is the alleged fraud,” said Gibb-Carsley. “Skycom employees, it’s alleged, were Huawei employees.”

The actions of Meng put the banks involved at serious financial risk, he said.

Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a bail hearing. Pictured is a sheriff keeping an eye on people who came to watch the proceedings. Jason Payne / PNG

Gibb-Carsley told the judge that while Meng vacations in Vancouver and has two “very expensive” homes in Vancouver, there’s no meaningful connection with Canada.

David Martin, a lawyer for Meng, told the judge that the fact that a person has worked hard and has resources should not be grounds to deny bail.

He noted that both Vancouver properties — worth a total of $14 million — would be available to be put up for bail.

Meng would not breach bail because to do so would humiliate her father whom she loves, said Martin. Her father, a former Chinese army intelligence officer, is the founder of Huawei.

“You can trust her,” said Martin.

As for the allegations against Meng, Martin said no evidence of fraud could be made out against his client, calling the Crown’s case a “skeletal” description of liability. He called the U.S. allegations “preposterous.”

The defence lawyer emphasized that the company’s mission was to comply with applicable export laws and regulations.

He said that a PowerPoint presentation used by Meng, which was central to the allegations against her, was produced in 2013, five years ago, and questioned why it’s taken so long for a prosecution to be launched.

Martin noted that Hong Kong Bank, one of the alleged fraud victims, has never filed a lawsuit against the company.

Meng’s links to Canada include her formerly having permanent residence status and her husband and several children having lived in Vancouver at one point, said Martin.

“There is a consistent involvement of this family in life in Vancouver,” he said.

Meng would not flee if she was released from prison, he said.

“She would be an outcast in China if she did. Her father would not recognize her. She would be a pariah.”

Meng appeared in court wearing a dark green tracksuit and sat in the prisoner’s dock beside a Mandarin interpreter. She was seen talking with her lawyer and smiling at a man in the public gallery before the proceedings began.

The bail hearing was packed with reporters, a number of them from outside Canada, as well as a large number of members of the Chinese-Canadian community.

Outside the courtroom six TV screens were set up to accommodate the overflow crowd.

Martin is expected to call several witnesses Monday to describe a program of “community custody” that would be available to Meng if she is granted bail.

He said there would be a number of conditions for any release, including a curfew, the surrender of any passports and surveillance if necessary.

The arrest touched off a firestorm of controversy because of the U.S.-China trade war. The company denied any wrongdoing and the Chinese government said the arrest was a human rights violation and demanded the release of Meng.

Meng is a prominent member of Chinese society as deputy chairwoman of the Huawei board. The company is a privately held juggernaut with projected 2018 sales of more than US$102 billion that has already overtaken Apple in smartphone sales.

On TV and social media, commentators likened her arrest to the hypothetical detention in China of a Mark Zuckerberg sibling or a cousin of Steve Jobs.

The U.S. is seeking the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies Co., after convincing Canada to arrest her on Dec. 1, likely in connection with violating sanctions against Iran. Huawei via AP

Meng’s bio on the company website says she joined in 1993 and held various positions across the company, including director of international accounting and CFO of Huawei Hong Kong. She holds a master’s degree from Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

For a period of time she was in charge of Huawei’s successful internationalization efforts.

Meng’s father, now 74, comes from rural roots, according to the Huawei website. His parents were school teachers and he grew up in the remote mountainous town in Guizhou province.

Huawei says Ren was a standout in the Chinese military’s engineering corps, retiring in 1983 when the unit disbanded.

Meng, who also goes by the first name Sabrina, is one of four deputy chairs listed on the Huawei website and one of three women to sit on the Huawei board.

Related
•Huawei executive arrested at YVR appears to have family ties to Vancouver homes
•Who is Wanzhou Meng? Huawei’s arrested CFO rose through ranks despite founder father’s rebuke
•Huawei arrest puts focus on Chinese company’s relationship with Canadian telecoms

With files from CP

kfraser@postmedia.com

twitter.com/keithrfraser

A sheriff watches proceedings inside the B.C. Supreme Courthouse as Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou attends her bail hearing in Vancouver on Dec. 7, 2018 in Vancouver. Jeff Vinnick / Getty Images

A man takes a photograph with a smartphone while waiting in line to enter a courtroom to attend a bail hearing for Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, at B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, on Dec. 7, 2018. DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou appeared in BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, Dec. 7, 2018 for a bail hearing. Meng, who was arrested Dec. 1 at Vancouver International airport as she transferred planes, is sought by US authorities on unspecified charges. An extradition hearing to decide Meng’s fate will follow. Jason Payne / PNG

Observers stand outside the B.C. Supreme Courthouse as they wait for news at the bail hearing for Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver on Dec. 7, 2018 in Vancouver. Jeff Vinnick / Getty Images

PLEASE USE THIS LINK AS LONG AS IT IS FUNCTIONAL..:
FROM.: https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/huawei-executive-wanted-for-extradition-appears-in-court-for-a-bail-hearing


FH.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


 
Last edited by: Full House on 17-12-18 12:22:05
Post ID: 237430 17-12-18 12:20:55
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Full House
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WHAT COULD HAPPEN NEXT IN THE MRS.MENG DETENTION..:

Here's what happens next in the Huawei CFO case

New York's Eastern District Court has until the end of January to file a full extradition request for Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou.
An expert in sanctions and fraud cases says the Canadians may be not want to extradite Meng because of concerns about retaliation from China.
The arrest caused a disruption in the stock market and complicated U.S.-China trade talks.

Updated 7:35 AM ET Wed, 19 Dec 2018 CNBC.com

Why the US thinks Huawei has been a massive national security threat for years
2:22 PM ET Mon, 17 Dec 2018 | 04:41

The Huawei sanctions fraud case rattled markets, stunned the tech world and put U.S. agencies on the spot. All three will be monitoring the next several weeks to see what's next.

Huawei is one of China's largest companies and is the second largest producer of mobile phones in the world. On Dec. 1, police in Vancouver arrested Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. Meng, the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, was charged in Vancouver over allegations that the company defrauded several banks, including HSBC and Standard Chartered, by concealing payments from Iran in violations of sanctions.

The case is defying expectations, said Amanda DeBusk, chair of the global international trade practice at Dechert law firm.

It not only triggered volatility in U.S. markets. It also has led to a series of responses from China that DeBusk believes will give incentive to Canada to settle the case rather than extradite Meng. Two Canadians have been arrested in China this month.

"Canadians will be expecting further retaliation if, in fact, they transport Ms. Meng to the United States and into the hands of U.S. authorities," said DeBusk.

"Normally, of course, extradition with the Canadians is sort of routine, ho-hum, the person is brought back to the United States, then you go through the criminal process in the U.S.," said DeBusk.

"But nothing is normal about this case."

In fact, a third Canadian has been reported detained in China, but Canada's diplomatic agency did not link it to Meng's arrest and no further details were available, according to the Toronto-based National Post.
Focusing on the charges of fraud

The United States has 60 days from the time of Meng's arrest to make its formal extradition request, according to a Canadian Department of Justice spokesman. That will include "all the evidence that they are relying on in support of extradition." After that, Canada would have 30 days to determine whether to procede.

In arguing their case in Canada, U.S. prosecutors will be most focused on the fraud allegations involving the banks, rather than Iran sanctions violations.

That's because extradition from Canada typically requires serious charges like fraud, according to DeBusk, who formerly served as the assistant secretary for export enforcement with the U.S. Department of Commerce.

"That's why you see all this framed in that way, to make extradition work," she said.

Following this step, Canada's attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, will have to decide whether to extradite Meng. Further challenges are likely if extradition is granted.

"At each stage of the extradition process in Canada, there is careful balancing of the interests of the person sought for extradition against Canada's international obligations," wrote Wilson-Raybould. "The person sought is able to challenge their extradition at multiple levels, both before the superior and appellate courts in Canada, and by making submissions to me on the issue of surrender."
What could happen if extradition is granted?

If the Huawei case makes it's way to the U.S., observers should expect involvement from an alphabet soup of regulators, she said, starting with the DOJ and the Office of Foreign Assets Control, which deals with sanctions violations.

She also expects the Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security and U.S. Customs Enforcement to be involved, as the agencies respectively will look to establish a U.S. connection to the alleged money trail between Huawei and Iran, and seek to discover any false statements that may have been made about that trail.

The case of Chinese equipment manufacturer ZTE may serve as a template for further proceedings against Huawei, said DeBusk.

In that case, the U.S. accused ZTE of selling American-made hardware to Iran. ZTE agreed to a combined $1.192 billion settlement, one of the Office of Foreign Assets Control's largest ever.

It's possible the U.S. could seek jail time over the allegations, but doing so would significantly complicate a case most experts already consider to be a "hot potato," DeBusk said.

Huawei has long found itself on the wrong side of claims of not only sanctions violations, but insecure equipment and collusion with the Chinese government to take part in espionage. The company has fiercely denied those claims.

WATCH: Japanese start-up unveils $3,100 ROBOT.....NEXT

FH.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/18/huawei-cfo-meng-wanzhou-extradition-case-what-happens-next.html

SOMETHING MORE TO CHEW..: https://www.technologyreview.com/magazine/2019/01/



 
Last edited by: Full House on 20-12-18 15:01:50
Post ID: 237435 20-12-18 14:55:37
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Full House
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Member since: Oct 12




Posts: 2481
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FRIDAYS ARE ALWAYS DULL DAYS. ON TOP OF IT IT WAS A SNOW DAY. THANK THE GOOD ONE A VERY GOOD FRIEND OF MINE DROPPED DOWN TO CHEER ME UP. HERE IS WHAT HIS PROPOSITION WAS.!!

Every day you got a friend or other feeding you Pepperoni Pizza, HOT DOGS and Hamburglers and what do you think it is made up of? I said to him BEEF. What do you think Pepperoni has, I said it is a mix of Beef and Pork. There you go that is 'HALFABULMYMAN" AND I Asked him what do you mean by that? He said that he will get back to me shortly. Then he said you have a sack of POTATOES and they are feeding you those Potato Vadas and Vada Pav at home and now take a look at yourself, you have now become a Couch Potato and take a look at the couch, it is showing off well and if you don't take good care of yourself you will have Half A Bull up your BUTT. HEY thanks for coming and running me down. I don't need friends like you walking in here to make me feel bad on a FRIDAY! Don't worry, I came here just to cheer you up and HUMMA HUMMA, just wait till I show you what I brought for you?

He said, now cheer up, I have got you a ZUMBA exercise course and it is from the Arabian Peninsula. I SAID 'HA HA' another belly dance course right? No my man it is some thing new. IT IS THE OTHER PART OF'HALFABULMYMAN' Stop this you are killing me now. It is very simple, all you have to do is stand up and learn to Piruet first, then then fling your arms up and down and then down your crotch, HA HA Like what Michael Jackson does, is it? and then swing your BUTT TO the EXTREMES, sideways and he said THAT SHOULD KNOCK A FEW EXTRA POUNDS OFF and rub your belly and your bozoom and say RATH KU KUSHENDE. THAT IS IT. If I do this, I will loose a few pounds will I? He said if you don't loose a few pounds don't worry You will loose a couple when the Balls fall off. WOW What a great FRIEND you are!!. I said.

Call me in a couple of weeks when you feel a lot better and he threw the CD at me and left. So when everyone went to sleep I got the CD and sneaked it into the computer player and got my head set, so that i don't wake anybody up and started to play it, and I also made it a little louder to enjoy it and guess what.. ...
I DON'T WANT TO KEEP YOU WAITING ANY MORE. HERE IT IS. BUT I AM WARNING YOU IT IS CONTAGEOUS AND YOU BETTER WATCH YOUR SHORTS AND THE FLOOR, IF ANYTHING IS RUNNING IT IS NOT THE MOUSE IN THE HOUSE. YOU ARE DOING ZUMBA AT YOUR OWN PERIL.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCeH1CHWtv4

ENJOY THE SAME...

T.G.I.F.,

FH.

SIDE NOTE.: Please don't let the LADIES learn it, you may have to buy them all a pair of new SPORTS BRAS. (Otherwise they will sling you know what, like the HOTENTOTS, OVER their shoulders)


---

https://lyricstranslate.com/ru/nilufar-usmanova-shaka-bum-lyrics.html


HERE ARE THE ORIGINAL AND THE LYRICS TO IT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Xd6lnQIP68


Узбекский.: Shaka bum

ОригиналТранслитерация

Tonglar kech otganda xafa bo‘lmayman,
Quyosh kech botganda xafa bo‘lmayman.
Muammolaring hal bo‘lib ketar sekin,
Topa olmaysan sog‘ligingni lekin.

Do‘stlarim aldasa, xafa bo‘lmayman,
Yor meni demasa, xafa bo‘lmayman.
Vaqti keladi, vaqti keladi,
Hamma o‘zi uchun biladi.

Bir bor kelamiz axir dunyoga.
Raqsga tush bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hayotda yashab ko‘r o‘zing uchun.
O‘tadi bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hammasi oldinda hali.

Raqsga tush bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hayotda yashab ko‘r o‘zing uchun.
O‘tadi-ketadi hayotda sevgi,
Raqsga tush endi.

Ustimdan kulsalar, xafa bo‘lmayman,
Qalbimni tilsalar, xafa bo‘lmayman.
Xafa bo‘laman, xafa bo‘laman lekin
Mehrimni baholashsalar agar tekin.

Yaqinlarim sotsa, xafa bo‘lmayman,
Yoki toshlar otsa, xafa bo‘lmayman.
Kunlar o‘tadi, oylar o‘tadi,
Hamma-hammasi unutiladi.

Bir bor kelamiz axir dunyoga.
Raqsga tush bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hayotda yashab ko‘r o‘zing uchun.
O‘tadi bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hammasi oldinda hali.
Raqsga tush bugun, shaka bum, shaka bum,
Hayotda yashab ko‘r o‘zing uchun.
O‘tadi-ketadi hayotda sevgi,
Raqsga tush endi.
(x2)

Har soniyamiz in’om
Qoldiraylik yaxshi nom.
Besh kunlik dunyoda
O‘ynab-kulib, bo‘laylik omon.

Har soniyamiz in’om,
Qoldiraylik yaxshi nom.
Besh kunlik dunyoda
Bo‘laylik omon.


FH


 
Last edited by: Full House on 06-02-19 23:01:00
Post ID: 237485 25-01-19 20:45:02
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Full House
Senior Desi
Member since: Oct 12




Posts: 2481
Location:


U.S. unveils criminal charges against China’s Huawei.. Mon., Jan. 28, 2019 TORONTO STAR

OTTAWA—The U.S. government announced nearly two dozen criminal charges against Huawei Technologies Monday in a high-profile news conference slamming the Chinese hi-tech giant, and ratcheting up pressure on Canada which is bearing Beijing’s wrath for arresting Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou.

As Ottawa fights to free two detained Canadians and avoid the death sentence for a third man in China, top Trump cabinet members and American justice officials revealed the formal charges.

They include 13 charges filed by a New York grand jury indictment against Huawei for allegedly misleading multinational banks about Huawei’s relationship to a company doing business in Iran, in violation of U.S. sanctions. The charges include allegations of attempting to obstruct justice by concealing evidence and moving potential witnesses back to China.

“We are deeply grateful to the government of Canada for its assistance and its steadfast commitment to the rule of law,” said acting U.S. attorney general Matthew Whitaker.

Whitaker also announced another series of 10 charges levied by a Seattle grand jury against Huawei for stealing U.S. technology from an American wireless company T-Mobile.

But Whitaker and the U.S. home security secretary especially took aim at Huawei’s alleged attempt to do an end-run around Iran sanctions, saying it jeopardized American national security laws. But Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross tried to distinguish it as a “law enforcement action” distinct from the coming trade talks.

The announcement comes two days before American justice officials were due to send formal documents and evidence to support the extradition of Meng. It also comes before senior Beijing officials were due in Washington in an attempt to reach a trade deal before the U.S. slaps even higher tariffs on Chinese imports at the beginning of March.

Earlier Monday the Chinese government underscored its view that Meng’s case is tainted by politics and slammed the United States and its efforts to persuade allies to ban Huawei on “the pretext of security. All countries should stay alerted to and resist such unreasonable actions of bullying.”

Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China’s foreign ministry, said the Meng case is “definitely not a pure judicial case. There are strong political motives and maneuverings behind it.”

“We once again urge the Canadian side to make the right choice, immediately release Ms. Meng.”

While Canada's Justice Minister David Lametti would not comment prior to the announcement, he made clear that Canada would honour its obligations under the Canada-U.S. extradition treaty and act.

“We will fulfil the obligations in the process which seeks to protect both the Charter rights of individuals as well as maintains our treaty obligations with the United States using a rule of law process that we and our court system which we are very proud of,” said Lametti.

Asked to respond to China’s claim the Meng case is politically motivated, Lametti said, “We are protecting Ms. Meng’s rights within that process and will continue to do so.”

According to a transcript posted on the Chinese ministry’s website, Geng dismissed Justin Trudeau’s weekend firing of Ambassador John McCallum, with little official comment other than to denounce Canada’s ongoing detention of Meng, saying McCallum’s ouster is a matter of “Canada’s domestic affairs and China has no comment on it.”

Trudeau demanded McCallum’s resignation Friday after he ignored a warning from the prime minister mid-week and repeated the mistake of talking publicly about the extradition case and how the plight of two Canadians detained by China in retaliation could be resolved via a deal between the U.S. and China.

Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters Monday that McCallum was asked to resign for expressing a position that was “inconsistent” with the government’s view of the Meng case. “The central job of an ambassador is to represent accurately the government’s position. John didn’t do that and that is why his position was untenable.”

Meng was released on bail in December, required to remain in Vancouver, and is due to appear in court again on Feb. 6. Justice Department lawyers revealed at her bail hearing that the U.S. wanted to extradite her to face fraud charges. They alleged she deliberately deceived multinational banks about Huawei’s ties to a company doing business in Iran, in violation of U.S. sanctions.

The U.S. Justice Department promised it would send the full package of documents to Ottawa by the Jan. 30, 2019 deadline in support of its controversial extradition request.

Meng is the Chief Financial Officer and deputy chair of China’s corporate darling, Huawei Technologies, which was founded by her father, company CEO Ren Zhengfei, who has close ties to the ruling Communist Party in Beijing.

Her arrest deeply angered President Xi Jinping, McCallum revealed last week.

Days after the RCMP arrested Meng under a Canada-U.S. extradition treaty, at the request of the U.S., China’s state security police arrested two Canadians, former diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor. They are being held on vague “suspicion” of threatening China’s national security but no charges have been laid.

Freeland said Canada will continue to rally allies in support of its demand that Beijing release Kovrig and Spavor, something China has warned against. And Freeland said it is “absolutely” possible to repair the damage done by last week’s series of events. Justice Minister David Lametti declined any comment on the substance of McCallum’s remarks, insisting that the case will be handled according to the rule of law.

Freeland has repeatedly said the Meng extradition should not be politicized — which McCallum’s remarks appeared to do.

He said she has a “quite good” legal defence and said one option to resolve the U.S. extradition request could be that the U.S. makes a deal with China to drop charges against Meng thereby paving the way for China to release the Canadians who are detained.

In the Commons, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer demanded why Trudeau showed “such weakness” and didn’t fire McCallum sooner. He said China is a “debacle” for the Liberal government and its foreign policy is a “disaster.”

Geng was not asked what impact the departure of McCallum, who was Trudeau’s hand-picked envoy and was personally engaged on the consular cases — would have on the ongoing detentions of Kovrig and Spavor. But the foreign ministry spokesman reiterated China’s firm stand on a third detained Canadian, Robert Schellenberg, who was hastily retried in the past two weeks by a court that elevated his 15-year jail term for drug trafficking to the death penalty.

The Trudeau government says China has acted “arbitrarily” in detaining the men, and in re-sentencing Schellenberg to face execution.

Geng said “China’s judicial authority” is dealing with Schellenberg’s “in strict accordance with the law.”

Schellenberg’s legal team is expected to file an appeal this week of the death sentence, but Geng exhibited little sympathy.

“China’s attitude is very clear,” said Geng. “We are a country governed by the rule of law, and everyone is equal before the law. Drug-related crimes, which bring great harm to society, are considered as felony around the world and severely cracked down upon by all countries.”

He said appeal questions “involve very serious and professional legal matters” and referred questions to “the competent authority.”

The fate of those three Canadians, and the prospects of fair legal treatment for about 200 other Canadians currently facing legal troubles or exit bans in China have upped the stakes for the Liberal government to find a replacement who will carry weight with the Chinese.

A senior government official told the Star that Xi’s office had communicated its desire that Ottawa send a politically connected ambassador — like Trudeau’s representative in Washington David MacNaughton — who would have the prime minister’s ear. When Trudeau appointed McCallum in 2017, the former cabinet minister and one-time bank economist became the first ambassadorial appointment to Beijing who didn’t come from Canada’s diplomatic corps. McCallum was a key political player within the Trudeau government, and as immigration and citizenship minister had steered the Liberals’ election promise to bring in 25,000 Syrian refugees.

For now, Trudeau has named Jim Nickel, McCallum’s former deputy head of mission in Beijing, as his interim replacement or chargé d’affaires at the embassy.

The government signalled on the weekend it would name another permanent ambassador soon.

NDP parliamentary leader Guy Caron told reporters Monday that Trudeau needs to explain “not just to parliamentarians, but to Canadians, what is Canada’s strategy and plan to address a situation that is presently sensitive.

“We don’t have an ambassador right now. We don’t have someone who is making the decisions basically for the embassy in a very sensitive situation with our relationship with China,” Caron said.

“We think that the federal government, by accepting the resignation, has done the right thing, even though it was belated. On the other side (the government) needs to actually act quickly to ensure there will be some stability on the Canadian side in China.”

After McCallum resigned, Scheer told reporters Trudeau should have fired McCallum after his first misstep, when he told mostly Chinese-language media in Markham that he believed Meng had “strong arguments” in her battle against extradition to the U.S.

Scheer told his MPs on Sunday that Canadians are tired of how Trudeau’s government “has damaged relationships with key allies and trading partners, backed down to Donald Trump on NAFTA, and refuses to get serious about the threat posed by China.”

Scheer has said he would no longer pursue talks toward a free trade deal with China — as Stephen Harper once did — and says Canada should ban Huawei from its 5G wireless infrastructure development over security concerns as several of its allies have.

In a statement released Saturday afternoon, Trudeau said he demanded McCallum’s resignation on Friday night.

That was after the Star published an interview with McCallum in Vancouver in which he said that it would be “great for Canada” if the United States relinquishes its attempt to extradite Huawei’s chief financial officer.

With files from Alex Ballingall, Susan Delacourt, Ottawa bureau. TORSTAR.

LINK..: https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2019/01/28/us-expected-to-announce-criminal-charges-related-to-china-and-national-security.html

NEWS THAT CAME OVER TODAY.

F.H.
XXX
How deep is Canada in trouble right now for getting involved in the China-US trade war? How can Canada get out of this mess?

Mas Miwa, former Engineer at Hughes Space and Communications.. Answered Dec 14 2018

Not deep. It is becoming more obvious by the day that Canada is being held hostage by the US for an accusation made by a UK bank against Skycom, a transaction that happened in late 2010, a year after Meng was related to Skycom by being on its board (2008 to 2009). Does anyone really believe a board member is actionable in the day to day operations of a company? The common phrase for such accusations is called ‘Trumped up charges’. A very appropriate term for the POTUS declaring he can undo these charges if China surrenders to US terms of peace in the ongoing trade war. The timing is highly suspect. The judge in the case said the facts presented by the US side was ‘suspicious’.

Have you seen the US serve extradition warrants against the UK, France, Germany, or Russia for violating US sanctions against Iran? Zero! Are there US companies doing business with Iran? Yes, they are granted exemptions, almost 300 of them. How magnanimous to be the hegemon.

“Decades of increasing sanctions against Iran have taken a toll on the Iranian economy and kept most companies out. But a broad range of organizations, from medical companies such as GE Healthcare to aerospace firms such as Lufthansa Technik, as well as educational institutions such as Harvard University, have obtained permission to operate in the country, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of sanctions licenses issued by the U.S. Department of Treasury in the first three months of 2014.

Below are a selection of 296 licenses, either granted or amended, for organizations to conduct business with Iran, demonstrating a sweep of legal commercial and non-profit activities that continue despite sanctions.

U.S. Department of Treasury does not make public how it reaches decisions on individual licenses, and it’s unclear why many of the waivers are granted.”

http://graphics.wsj.com/iran-san...

http://graphics.wsj.com/iran-sanctions/

View Sharers..

FH.


 
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Post ID: 237488 28-01-19 20:03:07
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