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  Canada Immigration Forum > Immigration & Citizenship > USA and other countries > PLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE HOW UNITED STATES WELCOMES YOU!!!!
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PLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE HOW UNITED STATES WELCOMES YOU!!!!




PLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE HOW UNITED STATES WELCOMES YOU!!!!
Dear CD'S,

I've in this site for the last 3 years. I've posted both sides of the stories of US and Canada. In this site all people do is prise US and look down at Canada. People still live in Canada but give negative remarks. Well it's personal choice.

Please read this article and pass on to as many people as you can. This is our very good family frineds from India. It'a a very sad story to go through for anyone at that age. Well let me reamind you to all CD'S. Till you or your family or close friends go through this hell you can realize the pain. (Please dont mistake me that i'm asking that you've to go through) I mean no one should go through this hell in life.

http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/05/12/sections/news/news/article_517149.php


Thanks,

Anand16


 
anand16

Senior Desi
Member since: Nov 03
Posts: 124
Location: Toronto

Post ID: 47452 12-05-05 17:44:18
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shankaracharya
Senior Desi
Member since: Dec 04




Posts: 768
Location:


Thanks Anand16 for highlighting this article to many of us.

It was recently mentioned that the Chennai Consulate handles about 450,000 visa application and grants about 50,000 visas annually. There are many parents who have the dream of visiting their children in USA and spending time with their grand children. They go back to India and talk about their visit to all the near and dear as an accomplishment.

This article highlights the insensitive way the immigration reacts to older people. This has happened before to actor Kamalhassan when he went to LA from Toronto and also to our ex-defence minister George Fernandes when he was transiting US. He was strip searched!

I forwarded this article to all the major newspapers and magazines in Tamil Nadu and hope this gets published to create awareness among many in India.

Rgds,
Shankaracharya

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Speech by Thomas Friedman of The New York Times....

"When we were young kids growing up in America, we were told to eat our
vegetables at dinner and not leave them. Mothers said, 'think of the
starving children in India and finish the dinner.' And now I tell my
children: 'Finish your maths homework. Think of the children in India
who would make you starve, if you don't.'"

 
Post ID: 47505 13-05-05 09:11:39
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anand16
Senior Desi
Member since: Nov 03




Posts: 124
Location: Toronto

Hi Shankra
Good to know someone atleast did read this article. Thanks for your help in forwarding the e-mail to all major newspaper. Please pass on to as many people as you can. Lets start this awareness.

Thanks,

Anand16


 
Post ID: 47567 13-05-05 11:59:59
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DiogenestheCynic
Senior Desi
Member since: Oct 04




Posts: 859
Location: At my desk


The link requires registration. Can you please copy and paste the article?
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Diogenes
====================
The Cynic

 
Post ID: 47600 13-05-05 12:45:43
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anand16
Senior Desi
Member since: Nov 03




Posts: 124
Location: Toronto


http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/05/12/sections/news/news/article_517149.php

 
Post ID: 47618 13-05-05 13:36:22
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Kabeer
Desi
Member since: Jan 05




Posts: 71
Location: of no fixed address


Quote:
Orginally posted by anand16

http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/05/12/sections/news/news/article_517149.php</font>


Dude, COPY and PASTE the TEXT of the article here NOT the link.


 
Post ID: 47622 13-05-05 13:39:51
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anand16
Senior Desi
Member since: Nov 03




Posts: 124
Location: Toronto


Thursday, May 12, 2005

U.S. entry denial was 'nightmare' for parents
O.C. family of Indian couple sent back despite visas say immigration agents are working with inaccurate data.

By GWENDOLYN DRISCOLL
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

The Indian couple flew for more than 20 hours to see their children and grandchildren in Orange County, arriving Sunday night - Mother's Day.

The visit lasted 45 minutes.

Then they were gone - escorted after a brief reunion with their shocked relatives in a departure lounge at Los Angeles International Airport by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to a plane bound for India, 24 hours after their arrival in the U.S.

The cause: a dispute over paperwork. The effect?

"I cried and cried and cried," said Rajeswari Ratnam, 68, reached from an airport phone Tuesday in Delhi, of the detention she and her husband, N.S. Venkatratnam, 75, experienced earlier this week. "I begged them: 'I want to talk to my children at least.'"

Instead, she and her husband were kept in a locked room for 24 hours, where they said they slept on the floor and were accompanied to the bathroom by guards. Eventually able to speak to their children by telephone, they did not see them until minutes before leaving the country.

The couple's paperwork seemed in order. Both carry valid visas necessary to enter the United States - in their case 10-year, multiple-entry visas that expire in 2010.

At question instead were the computerized dates of the couple's past visit to the U.S. five years ago.

CBP Port Director Ana Hinojosa on Wednesday said officials were doing their job by returning the couple after immigration computer systems failed to find evidence of a visa extension allowing the earlier visit in April 2000 to be prolonged by six months.

"When there is a question we do afford the passengers the opportunity to provide information to contradict that," Hinojosa said. "In this case, there was not the supporting documentation."

Tough border scrutiny is essential in an age of terrorism, supporters say.

But immigration-rights advocates said such scrutiny - including detention of the Venkatratnams - might be based on inaccurate computer data.

The case comes one week after the Government Accountability Office issued testimony that stated immigration agencies such as Customs and Border Protection face significant management challenges, including establishing "accurate and timely" computer systems.

Although the testimony by Homeland Security and Justice Issues Director Richard M. Stana stated that some agencies were in the process of updating their case management systems, he noted "that information sharing technology for homeland security (is) a high-risk issue."

"It's abysmal," said Lucas Guttentag, national director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Immigration Rights Project. "As a matter of course, the Immigration Service has been incapable of adequately inputting, maintaining, and checking records."

The Venkatratnams' son Hirash Venkat, a finance manager for the Newport-based Pacific Life Insurance Company, blamed a computer flaw for Sunday's "nightmare," when the parents they came to greet with red roses and mangos were instead sent home.

"We were holding flowers, waiting in the line, the flight arrived at 4:45," Venkat said. "The clock turned five, six, seven, eight o'clock. We got really worried."

Around 9 p.m., Harish's brother Suresh, a program manager for Cisco Systems in San Jose, got a call. It was CBP requesting proof of his parents' previous visit to the United States in 2000.

The computer couldn't find evidence of the visa extension. The family, CBP said, had 24 hours to prove it existed.

"I'm racking my brains trying to think of why would I keep a copy of an extension request," Suresh Venkat said.

On the CBP Web site, foreign visitors are instructed to retain a returned portion of a white "I-94" card stamped with any extension dates as proof that they obeyed immigration laws. But few understand they have to keep past proof in order to make future trips, Irvine immigration lawyer Angelo Paparelli said.

Suresh searched his records to find the cashed check used to pay for the visa extension. But it was lodged in the records hall of the Bank of America on microfiche film.

It took until noon Monday to get a copy faxed. But there was a problem. The check's resolution, after being copied from microfiche and faxed, was poor - CBP officials couldn't read it, the Venkats said. It was also not proof the extension was approved, Hinojosa said.

With hours to deadline, Suresh tried another approach- his 2000 IRS records, when he took a tax deduction for the year his dependent parents lived with him.

The IRS paperwork showed his parents' "I-94" visa numbers. But when CBP ran them, the extension did not appear.

Faced with a lack of supporting documentation, Hinojosa said her officers were forced to expel the couple.

Immigration-rights groups said the Venkatratnams' paperwork could be missing for reasons as simple as a spelling or typographical error.

Transferring a name like "Venkatratnam" from a written application to a computer poses data entry problems, such as spelling errors.

Hinojosa said her officers went "out of their way" to check different spellings of the couple's names.

Other confusions arise because two federal agencies expedite foreign travelers.

Hinojosa said that her CBP officers - who screen visitors at the border - are dependent on the information they receive from the Citizenship and Immigration Service, an agency with a history of computer problems.

A 2002 Justice Department memorandum by then-Inspector General Glenn A. Fine noted that computer records of visa extensions were "not reliable" in "determining with certainty whether an alien who appears to be an overstay is actually an overstay."

The best guardian of immigration information, Hinojosa said, are the passengers.

"When you have a foreign (visitor), the burden of proving admissibility is on the passenger," Hinojosa said. "I think if this family had produced actual proof of the granting of an extension ...(we) would (not) have held them back."

In Delhi on Tuesday, Ratnam said she was still not sure what paperwork she signed during her detention.

"There were so many forms," Ratnam said. "They wanted us to sign everything. Because I wanted to play with my grandchildren, that was the only thing I saw. So, I signed everything."

The couple eventually discovered that they had signed a "withdrawal of admission" - a legal form that allows for both their removal and the cancellation of their current, multi-year visa.

Hinojosa said the elderly couple did not qualify for a "deferred inspection" - a grace period of a week or more in which the couple could stay until their documents were verified.

Hinojosa said such deferrals are only granted "when we have sufficient reason to believe that we have part of the documentation but they're missing a piece that we know that they can get."

Hirash Venkat has since learned that for a fee he can get a copy of the missing extension request - from the Immigration Service itself.

"Isn't that the most amazing and depressing thing?" he said. "If we had only had more time. But we were not given the opportunity."

Ratnam said she and her husband will not return to the United States.

"It's such a great country, such a developed country," she said. "It's shocking we've been treated so badly."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Copyright 2005 The Orange County Register | Privacy policy | User agreement


 
Post ID: 47646 13-05-05 14:37:15
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Sleekness
Junior Desi
Member since: Mar 05




Posts: 18
Location:


THAT, is seriously fuct up.

 
Post ID: 52597 14-07-05 16:12:16
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Sleekness
Junior Desi
Member since: Mar 05




Posts: 18
Location:


THAT, is seriously fuct up.

 
Post ID: 52598 14-07-05 16:22:47
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STHIRU18
Senior Desi
Member since: Apr 04




Posts: 103
Location: MISSISSAUGA


Quote:
Orginally posted by shankaracharya

Thanks Anand16 for highlighting this article to many of us.

It was recently mentioned that the Chennai Consulate handles about 450,000 visa application and grants about 50,000 visas annually. There are many parents who have the dream of visiting their children in USA and spending time with their grand children. They go back to India and talk about their visit to all the near and dear as an accomplishment.

This article highlights the insensitive way the immigration reacts to older people. This has happened before to actor Kamalhassan when he went to LA from Toronto and also to our ex-defence minister George Fernandes when he was transiting US. He was strip searched!

I forwarded this article to all the major newspapers and magazines in Tamil Nadu and hope this gets published to create awareness among many in India.

Rgds,
Shankaracharya



I am amused that Shankaracharya believes that Kamalhassan should be treated differently. He may be a great actor........ but that's where his stature ends. He holds no public office, doesn't represent the country nor is a dignitary. Just because his fans worship in India, doesn't necessarily mean that he should be treated differently. I am apalled that we still treat actors like gods.

I was talking about the George fernandes issue to a friend. His retort was.....Do you know the way this guy dresses, even when he goes abroad? No one would consider him a defense minister in the world's largest democracy. He goes about in a Desi Kurta pyjama even when abroad.

Now for those who will take offense. I have nothing against the attire - but haven't we heard of the old adage \" when in rome, do as romans do\"?. Besides, what did the government do when this happened? where was the diplomatic corps........ and why did the minister wait for such a long time before going public with this ?

I know that this is an affront to the country. I may not necessarily agree that he was treated differently because of the attire, but there was no need to take it lying down. The Bharat Sarkar should have asked for an explanation from the persons or authorities in question.

On second thought, if the Government of India doesn't come to the rescue of it's own minister, what do we do,as common people?

Any answers?


 
Post ID: 52601 14-07-05 16:41:26
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Contributors:
anand16(4)  DesiTiger(4)  DiogenestheCynic(1)  Kabeer(1)  manjeet444(2)  shankaracharya(1)  Sleekness(2)  
STHIRU18(1)  
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